Tag Archives: interactive

Interactive Craft Breweries and Wineries Map

10 Oct

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Published a map of Western Pennsylvania craft breweries and wineries.

You can see the original here and click around: https://newsinteractive.post-gazette.com/drink-map/

Western PA

Allegheny County

City of Pittsburgh

Advertisements

Relative probability that someone in any U.S. county has a Facebook friendship link to Allegheny County, Pa.

20 Sep

Click to make BIG

Pretty fascinating article in the New York Times about how our facebook social networks are distributed. Turns out state lines do seem to matter, unless you live in say Manhattan or DC.

You can go to the map and click on any county in the US and see the relative likelihood that your county is connected to any other county. The darker the color, the greater the likelihood.

Below are Allegheny County’s stats. Not at all shocking, but I was hoping to see a bit more on the Steeler Nation diaspora. Although we are pretty heavy in Florida.

Share of friends who live within …

50 miles: 62%, 100 miles: 65%, 500 miles: 88%

COUNTIES MOST CLOSELY CONNECTED TO ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PA.
1. Washington County, Pa.
2. Westmoreland County, Pa.
3. Beaver County, Pa.
4. Butler County, Pa.
5. Lawrence County, Pa.
6. Indiana County, Pa.
7. Fayette County, Pa.
8. Clarion County, Pa.
9. Hancock County, W.Va.
10. Armstrong County, Pa.
11. Greene County, Pa.
12. Centre County, Pa.

Pipeline Map, Fractracker

12 Sep

Click to make BIG

As everyone knows, there was a pipeline explosion in Beaver County over the weekend, a mere 30 miles from Pittsburgh. The pipeline was one week old

Thanks to Fractracker, we have a map of all of the pipelines in the state of Pennsylvania.

You can click around the map and see things such as who owns and operates a particular line, natural gas spills and incidents, where the pipelines cross waterways and wetlands, among other useful info.

According to the site, “pipeline data is published from a variety of public agencies, although almost none of it is really accessible or accurate.” “While they do not publish gas pipelines, they do have a 2012 dataset of natural gas liquid routes, which is a significant portion of the hazardous liquid inventory. From an analytical point of view, however, this dataset is essentially worthless. Many of these pipelines are so generalized that they don’t make a single bend for multiple counties, and the actual location of the routes can be miles from where the data are represented. Communities cannot use this as a tool to better understand how pipelines interact with places that are important to them, like schools, hospitals, and residential neighborhoods.

Photos of the Beaver County explosion:

 

Road orientation mapping tool

18 Jul

Everyone knows that Pittsburgh’s roads go every which way. Well now there’s a new tool to let you pick any place on a map, and it will generate a road orientation image that visualizes how twisted your streets are.

Pittsburgh’s always comes out like a shining sun.

Whereas, for comparison, here’s a shot of Indianapolis, Indiana, a city with a near perfect street grid.

Fun!

You can play around with this tool here.

Where was Pittsburgh located in Pangea?

18 Jul

Pittsburgh City-County Building’s location in Pangea, 240 Million years ago. Click to make big

There’s a cool website that allows you to plug in any address and see where it was located on ancient earth and see what was going on in the atmosphere and life at that moment. For instance, 240 million years ago, or Pangea, the City-County Building was located on a mountain range, during a time when oxygen levels were low due to extinction of land plants, but fortunately some birds, mammals and dinosaurs survived.

Here is the City-County Building 300 million years ago, when Pittsburgh was some ocean front property.

The website allows you to go back to 750 million years ago.

Check it out here, and find out more about the project on this article.

Pittsburgh Commuter Rail Long Gone, 1942

5 Apr

Click map to make BIG or click here for interactive

Another depressing map about things that we used to have, that leaders in all of their wisdom drove into the ground, and now we wish we had again.

South Side resident Aaron Reinard created a map that plots the old commuter rail schedules onto a Google map to show how extensive our train lines once were, color coded with all 245 stations. Schedules are from the June 1942 “Official Guide Of The Railways.”

According to Reinard, service was abandoned in 1964, making it the largest commuter rail service in the country to be completely discontinued.

Stolen Native Lands or the Invasion of America Map

2 Feb

native

How the United States took over an eighth of the world

While executive orders are all the rage, this map shows how the US stole Native land, often by executive order. In one of Trump’s first acts as president, putting his views of Native Americans and the oil/gas industry in plain view, he carried on this tradition and signed an Executive Order to move the Dakota Access Pipeline forward.

While everything below the Allegheny was “seized by colonists before 1776,” anything North of the Allegheny was taken from the Six Nations of New York from a treaty in 1784. If you go to the map, you can turn on a layer of the source maps, as well as click on an area and find a direct link to things like: the related treaty, description of the tract, and the source map.

“In the 1850s, US presidents began using a second legal instrument to secure land, the executive order, and this prerogative grew in importance after 1871, when the federal government unilaterally stopped making treaties with native peoples. The power of the president to seize land by executive order may appear contrary to the sanctity of private property, one of the great legacies of the American Revolution, but white Americans never set Indian land title on the same footing as their own. Nor did they recognize the irony of their presumptions.”

Check out this incredible map here. It truly is an amazing map.

newmap

%d bloggers like this: